Adult Fiction for December

“Motherland Hotel” by Yusuf Atlgan, translated by Fred Stark. Camus meets Orhan Pamuk, via Freud, in this existentialist novel by the father of Turkish modernism. curtain-of-death

“The Magdalen Girls” by V.S. Alexander. When her beauty provokes a lustful revelation from a young priest, sixteen-year-old Teagan is sent to one of Dublin’s Magdalen Laundries for fallen women, where she befriends two other girls who help her endure the harsh captivity.

“Lord of the Privateers” by Stephanie Laurens. Widely known as the lord of the privateers, Royd Frobisher expects to execute the final stage of the rescue mission his brothers have begun. What he does not expect is to be pressured into taking Isobel Carmichael, his childhood sweetheart, former bride, and current business partner, with him.

“The Ice Beneath Her” by Camilla Grebe, translated by Elizabeth Clark Wessel. Winter s chill has descended on Stockholm as police arrive at the scene of a shocking murder. An unidentified woman lies beheaded in a posh suburban home a brutal crime made all the more disturbing by its uncanny resemblance to an unsolved killing ten years earlier. But this time there s a suspect: the charismatic and controversial chain-store CEO Jesper Orre, who owns the home but is nowhere to be found.

“Curtain of Death” by W.E.B. Griffin & WIlliam Butterworth. From #1  New York Times  bestselling author W. E. B. Griffin comes the dramatic third novel in the Clandestine Operations series about the Cold War, the fledgling Central Intelligence Agency and a new breed of warrior.

“After the Crown” by K.B. Wagers. Contains an excerpt from the third book in the series.

“Kill the Next One” by Federico Axat. Ted McKay had it all: a beautiful wife, two daughters, a high-paying job. But after being diagnosed with a terminal brain tumor he finds himself with a gun to his temple, ready to pull the trigger. Then the doorbell rings. A stranger makes him a proposition: why not kill two deserving men before dying?

“Moshi-Moshi” by Banana Yoshimoto. In  Moshi-Moshi , Yoshie s much-loved musician father has died in a suicide pact with an unknown woman. It is only when Yoshie and her mother move to Shimo-kitazawa, a traditional Tokyo neighborhood of narrow streets, quirky shops, and friendly residents that they can finally start to put their painful past behind them. However, despite their attempts to move forward, Yoshie is haunted by nightmares in which her father is looking for the phone he left behind on the day he died, or on which she is trying unsuccessfully to call him.

“The Reek of Red Herrings” by Catriona McPherson. First published in Great Britain under the title Dandy Gilver and the reek of red herrings

“The Seventh Plague” by James Rollins. Two years after vanishing into the Sudanese desert, the leader of a British archeological expedition, Professor Harold McCabe, comes stumbling out of the sands, frantic and delirious, but he dies before he can tell his story. The mystery deepens when an autopsy uncovers a bizarre corruption: someone had begun to mummify the professor s body while he was still alive.seventh-plague

“Christmas Masquerade” by Debbie Macomber. Jo Marie first met Andrew, her dream man, in the crush of a Mardi Gras parade. But by Christmas, he was introduced to her as someone else’s fiance.    Yet Jo Marie noticed that Andrew and his intended didn’t always act like a loving couple. In fact, in the whirl of Christmas parties and festivities they constantly seemed to be changing partners.

“PhDeath: The Puzzler Murders” by James P. Carse. “PhDeath” is a fast-paced thriller set in a major university in a major city on a square. The faculty finds itself in deadly intellectual combat with the anonymous Puzzler. Along with teams of U.S. Military Intelligence and the city’s top detective and aided by the Puzzle Master of The New York Times, their collective brains are no match for the Puzzler’s perverse talents.

“Another Place You’ve Never Been” by Rebecca Kaufman.  In her mid-thirties and living in Buffalo, NY (where she is originally from), Tracy spends most days at the restaurant where she works as a hostess, despite her aspirations of a career that would make use of her creative talents. Tracy s life is explored not only though her own personal point of view, but also through the viewpoints of other characters, wherein Tracy may only make a peripheral appearance or even emerge at different periods in her life.

“The Highwayman” by Craig Johnson. When Wyoming highway patrolman Rosey Wayman is transferred to the beautiful and imposing landscape of the Wind River Canyon, an area the troopers refer to as no-man’s-land because of the lack of radio communication, she starts receiving “officer needs assistance” calls. The problem? They’re coming from Bobby Womack, a legendary Arapaho patrolman who met a fiery death in the canyon almost a half-century ago.

“Perfidia” by James Ellroy. YEAR   Los Angeles. December, 1941. America stands at the brink of World War II. War fever and racial hatred grip the city.   The hellish murder of a Japanese family summons three men and one woman. LAPD captain William H. Parker is superbly gifted, corrosively ambitious, liquored-up, and consumed by dubious ideology. He is bitterly at odds with Sergeant Dudley Smith Irish emigre, ex-IRA killer, fledgling war profiteer. Hideo Ashida is a police chemist and the only Japanese on the L.A. cop payroll. Kay Lake is a twenty-one-year-old dilettante looking for adventure. The investigation throws them together and rips them apart.

To check availability for these or to find other books in the collection, click to search the JCLI catalog. To place a hold, enter your library card number and your password. Click if you need a library card application, or request one at your local branch.

This is just a sampling of new books now available from any of the four branches of Josephine Community Libraries, thanks to funding from the Carpenter Foundation, the Meyer Memorial Trust, Grants Pass Friends of the Library, and donors like you and your neighbors.