New Adult Fiction for January

“The Antiques” by Kris D’Agostino. On the night of a massive, record-breaking hurricane, George Westfall, an upstate New York antique store owner and father of three, lays dying. As his wife Ana seals up the storefront, their adult son Armie hides from the outside world as he always does, immersed in woodwork and thoughts of the past. In New York City, Armie’s older brother Josef, a sex-addicted techie, is fighting to repair his broken relationship with his daughters.

“The Bear and the Nightingale” by Katherine Arden. In a village at the edge of the wilderness of northern Russia, where the winds blow cold and the snow falls many months of the year, a stranger with piercing blue eyes presents a new father with a gift – a precious jewel on a delicate chain, intended for his young daughter. Uncertain of its meaning, Pytor hides the gift away and Vasya grows up a wild, willful girl, to the chagrin of her family. But when mysterious forces threaten the happiness of their village, Vasya discovers that, armed only with the necklace, she may be the only one who can keep the darkness at bay.

“The Butcher’s Hook” by Janet Ellis. Set in Georgian London, the dark and twisted tale of a young girl who determines to take her destiny into her own hands no matter the cost.dead-and-breakfast

“The Dark Room” by Jonathan Moore. Suspense that never stops. If you like Michael Connelly’s novels, you will gobble up Jonathan Moore’s “The Dark Room.” The heart-pounding follow-up to “The Poison Artist,” called an electrifying read by Stephen King that shows what happens when our deepest secrets are unburied.

“Dead and Breakfast” by Kate Kingsbury. Melanie West is getting her life back on track after a messy divorce when her grandmother, Liza Harris, asks her to open a B&B with her. Together, Liza and Melanie purchase a purportedly haunted mansion on the Oregon coast and jump right into clearing out the cobwebs. But while attempting to remove wallpaper in an upstairs bedroom, the new B&B owners stumble upon a very real skeleton in their closet.

“Doctorow: Collected Stories” by E.L. Doctorow. E. L. Doctorow selected some of his finest stories to create this pinnacle collection, his final project before his death. There are 15 stories total, including “The Water Works,” “Jolene,” “All the Time in the World,” and Doctorow’s own revision of “Liner Notes: The Songs of Billy Bathgate.”

“The Dry” by Jane Harper. After getting a note demanding his presence, Federal Agent Aaron Falk arrives in his hometown for the first time in decades to attend the funeral of his best friend Luke. Twenty years ago when Falk was accused of murder, Luke was his alibi. Falk and his father fled under a cloud of suspicion, saved from prosecution only because of Luke’s steadfast claim that the boys had been together at the time of the crime. But now more than one person knows they didn’t tell the truth back then, and Luke is dead.

“For Time and All Eternities” by Mette Ivy Harrison. Mormon bishop’s wife Linda Wallheim is stunned to learn her son Kenneth has gotten engaged to a young woman from a polygamous family. Naomi Carter may have left the religion she grew up in, but the Carters will still be the Wallheims’ in-laws once Kenneth and Naomi are married.

“Huck Out West” by Robert Coover. Our leading postmodernist novelist turns his iconoclastic eye on a great American classic, evoking the language and irreverent spirit of Mark Twain.

“If You Are There” by Susan Sherman. In the early 1900s, Lucia Rutkowski escapes the Warsaw ghetto to work as a kitchen maid in one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in Paris. Too talented for her lowly position, Lucia is thrown out on the street. Her only recourse is to take a job working for two disorganized, rather poor married scientists so distracted by their work that their house and young child are often neglected. Lucia soon bonds with her eccentric employers, watching as their work with radioactive materials grows increasingly noticed by the world, then rising to fame as the great Marie and Pierre Curie.

“Little Heaven” by Nick Cutter. A trio of mismatched mercenaries is hired by a young woman for a deceptively simple task: check in on her nephew, who may have been taken against his will to a remote New Mexico backwoods settlement called Little Heaven. Shortly after they arrive, things begin to turn ominous.

“Lucky Boy” by Shanthi Sekharin. (Also available in audio, read by Soneela Nanknai and Roxana Ortega). Eighteen years old and fizzing with optimism, Solimar Castro-Valdez embarks on a perilous journey across the Mexican border. Weeks later, she arrives in Berkeley, California, dazed by first love found then lost, and pregnant. This was not the plan. Undocumented and unmoored, Soli discovers that her son, Ignacio, can become her touchstone, and motherhood her identity in a world where she is otherwise invisible.

“The Most Dangerous Place on Earth” by Lindsey Lee Johnson. The wealthy enclaves north of San Francisco are not the paradise they appear to be, and nobody knows this better than the students of a local high school.Despite being raised with all the opportunities money can buy, these vulnerable kids are navigating a treacherous adolescence in which every action, every rumor, every feeling, is potentially postable, shareable, viral.

“Ring of Fire” by Brad Taylor. Fifteen years ago, in order to win a contract in the Kingdom, a desperate defense contractor used a shell company to provide a bribe to a wealthy Saudi businessman. Now a powerful player in the defense industry, he panics when the Panama Papers burst onto the public scene. Providing insight into the illicit deeds of offshore financing, they could prove his undoing.

“Savage Theories” by Pola Oloxarac. Rosa Ostreech, a pseudonym for the novel s beautiful but self-conscious narrator, carries around a trilingual edition of Aristotle s Metaphysics, struggles with her thesis on violence and culture, sleeps with a bourgeois former guerrilla, and pursues her elderly professor with a highly charged blend of eroticism and desperation. Elsewhere on campus, Pabst and Kamtchowsky tour the underground scene of Buenos Aires, dabbling in ketamine, group sex, video games, and hacking.

“The Second Mrs. Hockaday” by Susan Rivers. The Civil War South comes to vivid life in this electrifying story of a woman’s plight and a legacy of deceit that echoes for generations. When Major Gryffth Hockaday is called to the front lines of the Civil War, his new bride is left to care for her husband’s three-hundred-acre farm and infant son. Placidia, a mere teenager herself living far from her family and completely unprepared to run a farm or raise a child, must endure the darkest days of the war on her own.

“The Sleepwalker” by Chris Bohjalian. When Annalee Ahlberg goes missing, her children fear the worst. Annalee is a sleepwalker whose affliction manifests in ways both bizarre and devastating. Once, she merely destroyed the hydrangeas in front of her Vermont home. More terrifying was the night her older daughter, Lianna, pulled her back from the precipice of the Gale River bridge. The morning of Annalee’s disappearance, a search party combs the nearby woods. Annalee’s husband, Warren, flies home from a business trip. Lianna is questioned by a young, hazel-eyed detective. And her little sister, Paige, takes to swimming the Gale to look for clues.

“Two Days Gone” by Randall Silvis. What could cause a man, when all the stars of fortune are shining upon him, to suddenly snap and destroy everything he has built? This is the question that haunts Sergeant Ryan DeMarco after the wife and children of beloved college professor and bestselling author Thomas Huston are found slaughtered in their home. Huston himself has disappeared and so is immediately cast as the prime suspect.

“Wanted, A Gentleman” by Kj Charles. …the grand romance of Mr. Martin St. Vincent . . . a Merchant with a Mission, also a Problem Mr. Theodore Swann . . . a humble Scribbler and Advertiser for Love.

“Below the Belt” by Stuart Woods. “Stone Barrington is back in the newest breakneck thriller from #1 New York Times-bestselling author Stuart Woods. Stone Barrington and the gang are back in the line of fire, but with his usual unflappable aplomb, Stone always comes out on top.”

“The Death of Kings: A John Madden Mystery” by Rennie Airth. On a hot summer day in 1938, a beautiful actress is murdered on the grand tom-clancyKent estate of Sir Jack Jessup, close friend of the Prince of Wales. The arrest of an ex-convict and his subsequent confession swiftly bring the case to a close, but in 1949, the reappearance of a jade necklace raises questions about the murder.

“Even the Dead: A Quirke Novel” by Benjamin Black. .  A car crashes into a tree in central Dublin and bursts into flames. The police assume the driver s death was either an accident or a suicide, but Quirke believes otherwise. Then his daughter Phoebe gets a mysterious visit from an acquaintance, who later disappears. . Phoebe asks her father for help, and Quirke in turn seeks the assistance of his old friend Inspector Hackett.

“The Girl in Green” by Derek Miller. From the award-winning author of “Norwegian by Night,”  a novel about two men on a misbegotten quest to save the girl they failed to save decades before.

“History of Wolves” by Emily Fridlund. “Fourteen-year-old Linda lives with her parents in the beautiful, austere woods of northern Minnesota, where their nearly abandoned commune stands as a last vestige of a lost counterculture world. Isolated at home and an outlander at school, Linda is drawn to the enigmatic, attractive Lily and new history teacher Mr. Grierson. When Mr. Grierson is charged with possessing child pornography, the implications of his arrest deeply affect Linda as she wrestles with her own fledgling desires and craving to belong.”

“The Lady of the Lakes” by Josi S. Kilpack. Young author Walter Scott is desperately in love with Mina, but after she rejects his marriage proposal, Walter travels to England, where he meets and courts a young Frenchwoman, Charlotte Carpenter and discovers there is a difference between a man’s first love and his best love.

“The Mistress” by Danielle Steel. A novel that interweaves the lives of a Russian mistress and the young French painter who falls in love with mistressher. Set in the South of France, London, and Paris, a gorgeous, innocent mistress of a Russian oligarch gradually finds independence via her own efforts and through her friendship with the artist, son of a world-renowned painter and his devoted muse/now restaurateur mother, reminiscent of Picasso and La Colombe D’or in St-Paul-de-Vence.

“Recluce Tales: Stories from the World of Recluce” by L.E. Modesitt. A collection of short stories set in the world of the Recluce saga features seventeen new tales and four popular reprints spanning the thousand-year history of Recluse, in an anthology complemented by a background essay.

“Selection Day” by Avarind Adiga. From Aravind Adiga, the bestselling, Booker Prize winning author of The White Tiger, a dazzling new novel about two brothers in a Mumbai slum who are raised by their obsessive father to become cricket stars, and whose coming of age threatens their relationship, future, and sense of themselves.

“The Strays” by Emily Bitto. On her first day at a new school, Lily befriends one of the daughters of infamous avant-garde painter Evan Trentham. Lily has never experienced anything like the Trenthams’ home, where Evan and his wife have created a wild, makeshift family of like-minded artists, all living and working together to escape the stifling conservatism of 1930’s Australia. An only child accustomed to loneliness, Lily soon becomes infatuated with the creative chaos of the Trenthams and aches to fully belong.

“The Murder Book” by Jane A. Adams. When three freshly-buried bodies are unearthed in the front yard of a rented cottage, DCI Henry Johnstone, a specialist murder detective from London, is summoned to investigate. Two of the victims are identified as Mary Fields, known to have worked as a prostitute, and her seven-year-old daughter Ruby. But who is the third victim and what was he doing at the cottage?

“A Rustle of Silk” by Alys Clare. Former ship s surgeon Gabriel Taverner is trying to re-establish himself as a physician in rural Devon. But it s not easy to gain the locals’ trust, and several disturbing incidents convince him that at least one person does not welcome him. When he’s called out to examine a body, he starts to uncover some darker aspects of the silk trade.

“Tom Clancy: True Faith and Allegiance” by Mark Greaney. It begins with a family dinner in Princeton, New Jersey. After months at sea, U.S. Navy Commander Scott Hagan, captain of the USS James Greer, is on leave when he is attacked by an armed man in a crowded restaurant. Hagan is shot, but he manages to fight off the attacker. Though severely wounded, the gunman reveals he is a Russian whose brother was killed when his submarine was destroyed by Commander Hagan s ship.

To check availability for these or to find other books in the collection, click to search the JCLI catalog. To place a hold, enter your library card number and your password. Click if you need a library card application, or request one at your local branch.

This is just a sampling of new books now available from any of the four branches of Josephine Community Libraries, thanks to funding from the Carpenter Foundation, the Meyer Memorial Trust, Grants Pass Friends of the Library, and donors like you and your neighbors.