New Adult Fiction for March

“The Black Book” by James Patterson. Being a cop runs in Billy Harney’s family. The son of Chicago’s Chief of Detectives whose twin sister, Patty, also followed in their father’s footsteps, there’s nothing Billy won’t give up for the job, including his life. Left for dead alongside his tempestuous former partner and a hard-charging assistant district attorney out for blood, Billy miraculously survives. But he remembers nothing about the events leading up to the shootout. 

“The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley” by Hannah Tinti.Loo is twelve when she moves back to the New England fishing village of her early youth. Her father, Hawley, finds work on the boats, while she undergoes the usual heartaches of a new kid in school. But lurking over Loo are mysteries, both of the mother who passed away, of the grandmother she’s forbidden to speak to. And hurtling towards both father and daughter are the ghosts of Hawley’s past.

“The Wrong Side of Goodbye” by Michael Connelly (Audiobook read by Titus Welliver). A reclusive billionaire is nearing the end of his life and is haunted by one regret: when he was young, he had a relationship with a Mexican girl, his great love. But soon after becoming pregnant, she disappeared. Did she have the baby? And if so, what happened to it? Desperate to know whether he has an heir, the dying magnate hires Bosch, the only person he can trust. With such a vast fortune at stake, Harry realizes that his mission could be risky not only for himself but for the one he’s seeking.

“The Blue Hour” by Laura Pritchett. The tight-knit residents of Blue Moon Mountain, nestled high in the Colorado Mountains, form an interconnected community of those living off the land, stunned by the beauty and isolation all around them. So when, at the onset of winter, the town veterinarian commits a violent act, the repercussions of that tragedy will be felt all across the mountainside, upending their lives and causing their paths to twist and collide in unexpected ways.

“Conviction” by Julia Dahl. In the summer of 1992, a year after riots exploded between black and Jewish neighbors in Crown Heights, a black family is brutally murdered in their Brooklyn home. A teenager is quickly convicted, and the justice system moves on. Twenty-two years later, journalist Rebekah Roberts gets a letter: I didn’t do it. Frustrated with her work at the city’s sleaziest tabloid, Rebekah starts to dig. But witnesses are missing, memories faded, and almost no one wants to talk about that grim, violent time in New York City.

“The Devil’s Feast” by Miranda Carter. London, 1842. Captain William Avery is persuaded to investigate a mysterious and horrible death at the Reform, London’s newest and grandest gentleman’s club–a death the club is desperate to hush up. What he soon discovers is a web of rivalries and hatreds, both personal and political, simmering behind the club’s handsome facade. At the center is its resident genius, Alexis Soyer, “the Napoleon of food,” a chef whose culinary brilliance is matched only by his talent for self-publicity.

“Mrs. Pargeter’s Public Relations” by Simon Brett. Mrs Pargeter is at a charity reception, where she meets a woman who claims to be her late husband’s sister. This encounter leads to digging into past secrets, the discovery of a body, visiting Greece and danger for Mrs Pargeter, as she learns the true nature of charity and the dubious skills by which Public Relations can make evil look good.

“Behind Closed Doors” by B.A. Paris (Audiobook read by Georgia Maguire). Everyone knows a couple like Jack and Grace. He has looks and wealth; she has charm and elegance. You’d like to get to know Grace better. But it’s difficult, because you realize Jack and Grace are never apart. Some might call this true love. Others might ask why Grace never answers the phone. Or how she can never meet for coffee, even though she doesn’t work. How she can cook such elaborate meals but remain so slim. And why there are bars on one of the bedroom windows.

“Today Will Be Different” by Maria Semple (Audiobook read by Kathleen Wilhoite). Eleanor Flood is going to re-examine her life, clean up her act, get dressed, only change into yoga clothes for yoga, which today she will actually attend, and be a better version of herself, all in one day.

“Before the Fall” by Noah Hawley (Audiobook read by Robert Petkoff). Eleven people – ten privileged, one down-on-his-luck painter – depart Martha’s Vineyard on a private jet headed for New York. Sixteen minutes later, the unthinkable happens: the plane plunges into the ocean. The only survivors are Scott Burroughs – the painter – and a four-year-old boy, who is now the last remaining member of an immensely wealthy and powerful media mogul’s family.

“Bad Blood” by Nick Oldham. What should have been a blissful retirement for former DCI Henry Christie turns into something deadly.     As Henry Christie settles into a new life running The Tawny Owl pub with his fiancee Alison, their rural idyll is disrupted by a violent intruder. After Henry foils a kidnap attempt on Alison’s daughter, it becomes clear that he and his family have become the targets of a ruthless professional killer. But who – and why?

“The Couple Next Door: by Shari Lapena. A domestic suspense debut about a young couple and their apparently friendly neighbors, a twisty rollercoaster ride of lies, betrayal, and the secrets between husbands and wives.

“Note Yet Unsung” by Tamera Alexander. Despite her training as a master violinist, Rebekah Carrington was denied entry into the Nashville Philharmonic by young conductor Nathaniel Whitcomb, who bowed to public opinion. Now, with a reluctant muse and a recurring pain in his head, he needs her help to finish his symphony. But how can he win back her trust when hes robbed her of her dream?

“The One Man” by Andrew Gross (Audiobook read by Edoardo Ballerini). Nathan Blum works behind a desk at an intelligence office in Washington, DC, but he longs to contribute to the war effort in a more meaningful way, and he has a particular skill set the U.S. suddenly needs. Nathan is fluent in German and Polish, he’s Semitic-looking, and he proved his scrappiness at a young age when he escaped from the Polish ghetto. Now the government wants him to take on the most dangerous assignment of his life: Nathan must sneak into Auschwitz on a mission to find and escape with one man.

“Summit” by Harry Farthing (Audiobook read by the author). After eight successful summits, Mount Everest guide Neil Quinn is confident he can handle anything the mountain throws his way. But then disaster strikes steps from the top, leaving him with a lot of questions and a very old swastika-embellished ice axe that should never have been so high on the mountain–not if Everest’s meticulously documented history is accurate

“Magic for Unlucky Girls” by A.A. Balaskovits. The fourteen fantastical stories in  Magic For Unlucky Girls  take the familiar tropes of fairytales and twist them into new and surprising shapes. These unlucky girls, struggling against a society that all too often oppresses them, are forced to navigate strange worlds as they try to survive. From carnivorous husbands to a bath of lemons to whirling basements that drive people mad, these stories are about the demons that lurk in the corners and the women who refuse to submit to them, instead fighting back–sometimes with their wit, sometimes with their beauty, and sometimes with shotguns in the dead of night.

“The Great Zoo of China” by Matthew Reilly. The all-new thriller from #1 internationally bestselling author Matthew Reilly! It is a secret the Chinese government has been keeping for forty years. They have found a species of animal no one believed even existed. It will amaze the world. Now the Chinese are ready to unveil their astonishing discovery within the greatest zoo ever constructed. A small group of VIPs and journalists has been brought to the zoo deep within China to see its fabulous creatures for the first time.

“The Case of the Green-Dressed Ghost” by Lucy Banks. Kester Lanner didn’t know what he was getting into when he followed his mother’s dying request to contact the mysterious Dr. Ribero. Kester’s youthful surety of the world is shaken as he learns the secrets his mother took great care to keep. Meeting Dr. Ribero reveals a side of his mother he never even guessed existed, for Ribero is his long lost father, and soon Kester is thrown into the family business: catching supernatural spirits.

“Celine” by Peter Heller. From the best-selling author of “The Dog Stars” and “The Painter,” a luminous, spine-tingling novel of suspense–the story of Celine, an elegant, aristocratic private eye who specializes in reuniting families, trying to make amends for a loss in her own past.

“Edgar and Lucy” by Victor Lodato. Eight-year-old Edgar Fini remembers nothing of the accident people still whisper about. He only knows that his father is gone, his mother has a limp, and his grandmother believes in ghosts. When Edgar meets a man with his own tragic story, the boy begins a journey into a secret wilderness where nothing is clear: not even the line between the living and the dead. In order to save her son, Lucy has no choice but to confront the demons of her past.

“Exit West” by Mohsin Hamid. In a country teetering on the brink of civil war, two young people meet–sensual, fiercely independent Nadia and gentle, restrained Saeed. They embark on a furtive love affair, thrust into premature intimacy by the unrest roiling their city. When it explodes, turning familiar streets into a patchwork of checkpoints and bomb blasts, they begin to hear whispers about doors–doors that can whisk people far away, if perilously and for a price.

“The Hearts of Men” by Nickolas Butler. A scarred Vietnam veteran and successful businessman reflects on his teen years as a social outcast and friend to a popular youth during a summer camp reunion marked by selflessness and an unthinkable event involving his friend’s family members.

“The Hollywood Daughter” by Kate Alcott. The coming-of-age story of a young woman in 1950s Hollywood who grew up idolizing Ingrid Bergman and is forced to reassess her beliefs and desires in the face of Ingrid’s scandalous affair with Roberto Rossellini and her fall from grace

“In the Name of the Family” by Sarah Dunant. Before the Corleones, before the Lannisters, there were the Borgias. Bestselling novelist Sarah Dunant has long been drawn to the high drama of Renaissance Italy: power, passion, beauty, brutality, and the ties of blood. With “In the Name of the Family,” she offers a thrilling exploration of the House of Borgia’s final years, in the company of a young diplomat named Niccolo Machiavelli.

“Minds of Winter” by Ed O’Loughlin. When Nelson Nilsson, an aimless drifter from Alberta, finds himself in Canada’s Northern Territories in search of his brother, he meets Fay Morgan by chance. Fay has just arrived from London, hoping to find answers to her burning questions about her past. When they discover that their questions about their pasts and present are inextricably linked, the two will become unlikely partners as they unravel a mystery that traverses continents and centuries.

“The Night Ocean” by Paul La Farge. Marina Willett, M.D., has a problem. Her husband Charlie has become obsessed with H.P. Lovecraft, in particular with one episode in the legendary horror writer’s life: in the summer of 1934, the ‘old gent’ lived for two months with a gay teenage fan named Robert Barlow, at Barlow’s family home in central Florida. What were the two of them up to? Were they friends–or something more?

“Police at the Station and They Don’t Look Friendly” by Adrian McKinty. Belfast 1988: A man is found dead, killed with a bolt from a crossbow in front of his house. This is no hunting accident. But uncovering who is responsible for the murder will take Detective Sean Duffy down his most dangerous road yet, a road that leads to a lonely clearing on a high bog where three masked gunmen will force Duffy to dig his own grave.

“The Roanoke Girls” by Amy Engel. After her mother’s suicide, fifteen-year-old Lane Roanoke came to live with her grandparents and fireball cousin Allegra on their vast estate in rural Kansas. Lane knew little of her mother’s mysterious family, but she quickly embraced life as one of the rich and beautiful Roanoke girls. But when she discovered the dark truth at the heart of the family, she ran–fast and far away. Eleven years later, Lane is adrift in Los Angeles when her grandfather calls to tell her Allegra has gone missing. Did she run too?

“Say Nothing” by Brad Parks. Judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job, a beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife Alison texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins.

“Seven Surrenders” by Ada Palmer. It is a world in which near-instantaneous travel from continent to continent is free to all. In which automation now provides for everybody’s basic needs. In which nobody living can remember an actual war … In which nationality is a fading memory, and most people identify instead with their choice of the seven global Hives, distinguished from one another by their different approaches to the big questions of life. And it is a world in which, unknown to most, the entire social order is teetering on the edge of collapse. Because even in utopia, humans will conspire.

“Silence Fallen” by Patricia Briggs. Attacked and abducted in her home territory, Mercy finds herself in the clutches of the most powerful vampire in the world, taken as a weapon to use against alpha werewolf Adam and the ruler of the Tri-Cities vampires. In coyote form, Mercy escapes–only to find herself without money, without clothing, and alone in the heart of Europe.

“The Trophy Child” by Paula Daly. Karen Bloom is not the coddling mother type. She believes in raising her children for success. Some in the neighborhood call her assertive, others say she’s driven, but in gossiping circles she’s known as: the tiger mother. Karen believes that tough discipline is the true art of parenting and that achievement leads to ultimate happiness. She expects her husband and her children to perform at 200 percent–no matter the cost. But in an unending quest for excellence, her seemingly flawless family start to rebel against her.

“The Violated” by Bill Pronzini. A new stand-alone thriller by an acclaimed master of the genre and author of the “Nameless Detective” series. In Echo Park, in the small town of Santa Rita, California, the mutilated body of Martin Torrey is found by two passersby. A registered sex offender, Torrey has been a suspect in a string of recent rapes, and instant suspicion for his murder falls on the relatives and friends of the women attacked. Police chief Griffin Kells and detective Robert Ortiz are under increasing pressure from the public and from a mayor demanding results in a case that has no easy solution.

“The Wages of Sin” by Kaite Welsh. A page-turning tale of murder, subversion and vice in which a female medical student in Victorian Edinburgh is drawn into a murder investigation when she recognizes one of the corpses in her anatomy lecture.