New Adult Nonfiction for March

“The Death and Life of the Great Lakes” by Dan Egan. A landmark work of science, history and reporting on the past, present and imperiled future of the Great Lakes.

“Richard Nixon: The Life” by John A. Farrell. Brilliantly researched, authoritatively crafted by a prize-winning biographer, and lively on the page, this is the Nixon we’ve been waiting for. Richard Nixon opens with young Navy lieutenant -Nick- Nixon returning from the Pacific and setting his cap at Congress, an idealistic dreamer seeking to build a better world. Yet amid the turns of that now legendary 1946 campaign, Nixon’s finer attributes quickly gave way to unapologetic ruthlessness. It is a stunning overture to John A. Farrell’s magisterial portrait of a man who embodied postwar American cynicism.

“Phenomena: The Secret History of the U.S. Government’s Investigations Into Extrasensory Perception and Psychokinesis” by Annie Jacobsen. ) For more than forty years, the U.S. government has researched extrasensory perception, using it in attempts to locate hostages, fugitives, secret bases, and downed fighter jets; to divine other nations’ secrets; and even to predict future threats to national security. The intelligence agencies and military services involved include the CIA, DIA, NSA, DEA, the Navy, Air Force, and Army–and even the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

“Inferno: The Doctor’s Ebola Story” by Steven Hatch. Dr. Steven Hatch first came to Liberia in November 2013, to work at a hospital in Monrovia. Six months later, several of the physicians Dr. Hatch had mentored and served with were dead or barely clinging to life, and ebola had become a world health emergency … A physician’s memoir about the ravages of a terrible disease and the small hospital that fought to contain it, Inferno is also an explanation of the science and biology of ebola: how it is transmitted and spreads with such ferocity.

“Change of Seasons: A Memoir” by John Oates. John Oates was born at the perfect time, paralleling the birth of rock ‘n roll. Raised in a small Pennsylvania town, he was exposed to folk, blues, soul, and R&B. Meeting and teaming up with Daryl Hall in the late 1960s, they developed a style of music that was uniquely their own but never abandoned their roots. John uncovers the grit and struggle it took to secure a recording contract with the legendary Atlantic Records and chronicles the artistic twists and turns that resulted in a DJ discovering an obscure album track that would become their first hit record.

“Anatomy of Innocence: Testimonies of the Wrongly Convicted” by Laura Caldwell and Leslie S. Klinger (eds.). Recalling the great muckrakers of the past, an outraged team of America’s best-selling writers unite to confront the disasters of wrongful convictions.

“In My Kitchen: A Collection of New and Favorite Vegetarian Recipes” by Deborah Madison.Deborah Madison’s newest book shares 100 beloved and innovative recipes from her vast repertoire, all pared down to the key ingredients needed to achieve delicious, nuanced flavor, with simplified preparations. In My Kitchen is a vegetable-forward cookbook organized alphabetically and featuring recipes like Roasted Jerusalem Artichoke Soup with Sunflower Sprouts; Fennel Shaved with Tarragon and Walnuts; and Olive Oil, Almond, and Blood Orange Cake. With dozens of tips for building onto, scaling back, and creating menus around, Deborah’s recipes have a modular quality that makes them particularly easy to use.

“Lenin on the Train” by Catherine Merridale. Now, in Lenin on the Train, drawing on a dazzling array of sources and never-before-seen archival material, renowned historian Catherine Merridale provides a riveting, nuanced account of this enormously consequential journey–the train ride that changed the world–as well as the underground conspiracy and subterfuge that went into making it happen. Writing with the same insight and formidable intelligence that distinguished her earlier works, she brings to life a world of counter-espionage and intrigue, wartime desperation, illicit finance, and misguided utopianism.

“Casey Stengel: Baseball’s Greatest Character” by Marty Appel. For a man who spent so much of his life in the limelight–an astounding fifty-five years in professional baseball–Stengel remains an enigma. Acclaimed New York Yankees’ historian and bestselling author Marty Appel digs into Casey Stengel’s quirks and foibles, unearthing a tremendous trove of baseball stories, perspective, and history.

“Simulacra” by Airea D. Matthews. A fresh and rebellious poetic voice, Airea D. Matthews debuts in the acclaimed series that showcases the work of exciting and innovative young American poets. Matthews’s superb collection explores the topic of want and desire with power, insight, and intense emotion. Her poems cross historical boundaries and speak emphatically from a racialized America, where the trajectories of joy and exploitation, striving and thwarting, violence and celebration are constrained by differentials of privilege and contemporary modes of communication.

“Explorer’s Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery and Adventure” by Huw Lewis-Jones and Kari Herbert. The sketchbook has been the one constant in explorers’ kits for centuries of adventure. Often private, they are records of immediate experiences and discoveries, and in their pages we can see what the explorers themselves encountered. This remarkable book showcases 70 such sketchbooks. Figures such as Charles Darwin and Sir Edmund Hillary are joined here by lesser-known explorers such as Adela Breton, who braved the jungles of Mexico to make a record of Mayan monuments.

“The Ragged Edge: A US Marine’s Account of Leading the Iraqi Army Fifth Battalion” by Michael Zacchea and Ted Kemp. Deployed to Iraq in March 2004 after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein, US Marine Michael Zacchea thought he had landed a plum assignment. His team’s mission was to build, train, and lead in combat the first Iraqi Army battalion trained by the US military. Quickly, he realized he was faced with a nearly impossible task. With just two weeks’ training based on outdated and irrelevant materials, no language instruction, and few cultural tips for interacting with his battalion of Shiites, Sunnis, Kurds, Yazidis, and others, Zacchea arrived at his base in Kirkush to learn his recruits would need beds, boots, uniforms, and equipment.

“Traveling the Power Line: From the Mojave Desert to the Bay of Fundy” by Julianne Couch. In our power-hungry world, all the talk about energy–what’s safe and what’s risky, what’s clean and what’s dirty, what’s cheap and what’s easy–tends to generate more heat than light. What, Julianne Couch wanted to know, is the real story on power production in this country? Approaching the question as a curious consumer, Couch takes us along as she visits nine sites where electrical power is developed from different fuel sources.

“The Legend of Zelda: Art & Artifacts” by Nintendo. The top-selling nonfiction book for the week of March 6. “The Legend of Zelda(TM) Art and Artifacts” contains over four hundred pages of fully realized illustrations from the entire thirty-year history of The Legend of Zelda(TM) including artwork from the upcoming The Legend of Zelda(TM) Breath of the Wild! Every masterwork is printed on high-quality paper in an oversized format so you can immerse yourself in the fine details of each piece. This book includes rare promotional pieces, game box art, instruction booklet illustrations, official character illustrations, sprite art, interviews with the artists, and much, much more!

“Down City: A Daughter’s Story of Love, Memory, and Murder” by Leah Carroll. Leah Carroll’s mother, a gifted amateur photographer, was murdered by two drug dealers with Mafia connections when Leah was four years old. Her father, a charming alcoholic who hurtled between depression and mania, was dead by the time she was eighteen. Why did her mother have to die? Why did the man who killed her receive such a light sentence? What darkness did Leah inherit from her parents? Leah was left to put together her own future and, now in her memoir, she explores the mystery of her parents’ lives through interviews, photos, and police records.

“Fallen Glory: The Lives and Deaths of History’s Greatest Buildings” by James Crawford. James Crawford uncovers the biographies of 20 of the world s most fascinating lost and ruined buildings, from the dawn of civilization to the cyber era. The lives of these iconic structures are packed with drama and intrigue, featuring war and religion, politics and art, love and betrayal, catastrophe and hope.

“How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain” by Lisa Feldman Barrett. A new theory of how the brain constructs emotions that could revolutionize psychology, health care, the legal system, and our understanding of the human mind.

“Isabella of Castile: Europe’s First Great Queen” by Giles Tremlett. A major biography of the queen who transformed Spain into a principal global power, and sponsored the voyage that would open the New World.

“March 1917: On the Brink of War and Revolution” by Will Englund. A riveting history of the month that transformed the world’s greatest nations as Russia faced revolution and America entered World War I.

“Mr. Darley’s Arabian: High Life, Low Life, Sporting Life: A History of Racing in Twenty-Five Horses” by Christopher McGrath. The audacious and inspired history of horse racing told through the bloodline of twenty-five exceptional Arabian steeds.

“The Price of Illusion: A Memoir” by Joan Juliet Buck. From Joan Juliet Buck, former editor-in-chief of Paris Vogue comes her dazzling, compulsively readable memoir: a fabulous account of four decades spent in the creative heart of London, New York, Los Angeles, and Paris, chronicling her quest to discover the difference between glitter and gold, illusion and reality, and what looks like happiness from the thing itself.

“The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit” by Michael Finkel. In 1986, a shy and intelligent twenty-year-old named Christopher Knight left his home in Massachusetts, drove to Maine, and disappeared into the forest. He would not have a conversation with another human being until nearly three decades later, when he was arrested for stealing food. Living in a tent even through brutal winters, he had survived by his wits and courage, developing ingenious ways to store edibles and water, and to avoid freezing to death.

“This Long Pursuit: Reflections of a Romantic Biographer” the Richard Holmes. From the award-winning author of The Age of Wonder and Falling Upwards, here is a luminous meditation on the art of biography that fuses the author’s own experiences with a history of the genre and explores the fascinating and surprising relationship between fact and fiction.

“Year of No Clutter: A Memoir” by Eve Schaub. The author explores the hoarding phenomenon as reflected by such cultural examples as Hoarders and The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up while sharing the personal story of how she organized a single room in her house that had been overtaken by psychological clutter.

“Big Agenda: President Trump’s Plan to Save America” by David Horowitz. One of the nation’s foremost conservative commentators, Horowitz presents a White House battle plan to halt what President Trump sees as the Democrats’ destruction of American values.

“Stealing Fire: How Silicon Valley, the Navy SEALs, and Maverick Scientists Are Revolutionizing the Way We Live and Work” by Steven Kotler. Argues that rare and controversial states of consciousness are being used by Silicon Valley, the Navy SEALS, and maverick scientists to boost information and inspiration and to solve critical challenges.

“This Life I Live: One Man’s Extraordinary, Ordinary Life and the Woman Who Changed It Forever” by Rory Feek. Joey and Rory Feek were enjoying a steadily growing fan base in country music when Joey was diagnosed unexpectedly with a rapidly spreading cancer. This vibrant and beautiful young woman would soon be on a unique journey for which no one is ever fully prepared. Her husband, Rory, and children, Heidi, Hopie, and Indiana, were beside her each step of the way.