New Adult Fiction for June

“The Identicals” by Elin Hildenbrand. Nantucket is only two and a half hours away from Martha’s Vineyard by ferry. But the two islands might as well be worlds apart for a set of identical twin sisters who have been at odds for years. Just because twins look exactly the same doesn’t mean they’re anything alike – and Tabitha and Harper Frost have spent their whole lives trying to prove this point. When a family crisis forces them to band together – or at least appear to – the twins come to realize that the special bond that they share is more important than the resentments that have driven them apart.

“Before Everything” by Victoria Redel. A group of women … have known one another since they were girls; they’ve faced everything together, from youthful sprees and scrapes to mid-life turning points. Now, as Anna, the group’s trailblazer and brightest spark, enters hospice, they gather to do what they’ve always done–talk and laugh and help each other make choices and plans, this time in Anna’s rural Massachusetts home.

“The Child” by Fiona Barton. Audiobook read by Mandy Williams, Rosalyn Landor & others. As an old house is demolished in a gentrifying section of London, a workman discovers a tiny skeleton, buried for years. For journalist Kate Waters, it’s a story that deserves attention. She cobbles together a piece for her newspaper, but at a loss for answers, she can only pose a question: Who is the Building Site Baby?

“The Cover Story” by Deb Richardson-Moore. A bizarre hit-and-run brings Branigan Powers back to the crime-solving beat   A fatal crash involving two college students heading home for the holidays seems like an unfortunate accident. But when the surviving girl wakens, she tells a curious story of the vehicle that forced them off the road–an old-fashioned, 1950s-style hearse.

“Every Last Lie: A Gripping Novel of Psychological Suspense” by Mary Kubica. Clara Solberg’s world shatters when her husband and their four-year-old daughter are in a car crash, killing Nick while Maisie is remarkably unharmed. The crash is ruled an accident until the coming days, when Maisie starts having night terrors that make Clara question what really happened on that fateful afternoon

“Fateful Mornings” by Tom Bouman.  In Wild Thyme, Pennsylvania, summer has brought Officer Henry Farrell nothing but trouble. Heroin has arrived with a surge in burglaries and other crime. When local carpenter Kevin O’Keeffe admits that he shot a man and that his girlfriend, Penny, is missing, the search leads the small-town cop to an industrial vice district across state lines that has already ensnared more than one of his neighbors. With the patience of a hunter, Farrell ventures into a world of shadow beyond the fields and forests of home.

“Flood” by Melissa Scholes Young. Laura Brooks fled her hometown of Hannibal, Missouri, ten years ago after a historic flood and personal heartbreak. Now she’s returned unannounced, and her family and friends don’t know what to make of it. She says she’s just home for a brief visit and her high-school reunion, but she’s carrying too much luggage for that: literal and metaphorical. Soon Laura is embroiled in small-town affairs–the contentious divorce of her rowdy best friend Rose; the campaign of her twelve-year-old godson, Bobby, to become the town’s official Tom Sawyer; and the renewed interest of the man Laura once thought she’d marry, Sammy McGuire.

“The Fourth Monkey” by J.D. Barker. Se7en  meets  The Silence of the Lambs  when a notorious serial killer is hit by a bus while delivering his signature message, leaving detective Sam Porter days to locate the last victim using clues from the killer’s disturbing diary, words that taunt Sam–even from beyond the grave.

“Golden Hill: A Novel of Old New York” by Francis Spufford. New York, a small town on the tip of Manhattan island, 1746. One rainy evening in November, a handsome young stranger fresh off the boat arrives at a counting house door on Golden Hill Street: this is Mr. Smith–amiable, charming, yet strangely determined to keep suspicion shimmering. For in his pocket, he has what seems to be an order for a thousand pounds, a huge sum, and he won’t explain why, or where he comes from, or what he is planning to do in the colonies that requires so much money.

“Midnight Jewel” by Richelle Mead. Audiobook read by Kyla Garcia. Mira is not like the other Glittering Court girls. She is a war refugee, cast out of her home country and thrust into another, where she has learned to fight against the many injustices around her. For some, the Glittering Court offers a chance at a life they’ve only ever dreamed of, one of luxury, glamour, and leisure. But for Mira, it’s simply a means to an end. In the new world, she plans to earn off her marriage contract price, and finally be free.

“The Right Side” by Spencer Quinn. A deeply damaged female soldier home from the war in Afghanistan becomes obsessed with finding a missing girl, gains an unlikely ally in a stray dog, and encounters new perils beyond the combat zone.

“Serenity Harbor: A Heartwarming Small Town Romance” by RaeAnne Thayne. In the town of Haven Point, love can be just a wish–and one magical kiss–away…    Computer-tech millionaire Bowie Callahan is about the last person that schoolteacher Katrina Bailey wants to work for. As far as she can see, he’s arrogant, entitled and not up to the task of caring for his young half brother, Milo. But Kat is, especially if it brings her closer to her goal of adopting an orphaned little girl. And as her kindness and patience work wonders with Milo, she realizes there’s more to sexy, wary Bo than she’d ever realized.

“The Sisters Chase” by Sarah Healy. A gripping novel about two sisters who are left homeless by their mother’s death, and the lengths the fierce older sister will go to protect her beloved young charge. The hardscrabble Chase women–Mary, Hannah, and their mother Diane–have been eking out a living running a tiny seaside motel that has been in the family for generations, inviting trouble into their lives for just as long.

“Spoonbenders” by Daryl Gregory. The Telemachus family is known for performing inexplicable feats on talk shows and late-night television. Teddy, a master conman, heads up a clan who possess gifts he only fakes: there’s Maureen, who can astral-project; Irene, the human lie detector; Frankie, gifted with telekinesis; and Buddy, the clairvoyant. But when, one night, the magic fails to materialize, the family withdraws to Chicago where they live in shame for years. Until, as they find themselves facing a troika of threats (CIA, Mafia, unrelenting skeptic), Matty, grandson of the family patriarch, discovers a bit of the old Telemachus magic in himself.

“Unsub” by Meg Gardiner. Caitlin Hendrix has been a narcotics detective for six months when the killer at the heart of all her childhood nightmares reemerges: the Prophet. The Prophet terrorized the Bay Area in the 1990s and nearly destroyed her father, the lead investigator on the case. Twenty years later, two bodies are found bearing the haunting signature of the Prophet.

“The Waking Land” by Callie Bates. A young girl is kidnapped by the king to punish her father’s rebellion against him. Years later, she returns home a fugitive, while grappling with a repressed magic that could, if mastered, make her the most powerful person in two kingdoms.

“Confessions of a Domestic Failure: A Humorous Book about a Not So Perfect Mom” by Bunmi Laditan. Introducing Ashley Keller, career girl turned stay-at-home mom who’s trying to navigate the world of Pinterest-perfect, Facebook-fantastic, and Instagram-impressive mommies but failing miserably. When Ashley gets the opportunity to participate in the Motherhood Better boot camp run by the mommy-blog-empire maven she idolizes, she jumps at the chance to become the perfect mom she’s always wanted to be. But will she fly high or flop?

“All the Stars in the Heavens” by Adriana Trigiani. The movie business is booming in 1935 when twenty-one-year-old Loretta Young meets thirty-four-year-old Clark Gable on the set of The Call of the Wild. Though he’s already married, Gable falls for the stunning and vivacious young actress instantly. Far from the glittering lights of Hollywood, Sister Alda Ducci has been forced to leave her convent and begin a new journey that leads her to Loretta. Becoming Miss Young’s secretary, the innocent and pious young Alda must navigate the wild terrain of Hollywood with fierce determination and a moral code that derives from her Italian roots.

“Ascension of Larks” by Rachel Linden. This stunning women’s fiction debut is for fans of Jodi Picoult and JoJo Moyes—one woman’s journey to finding joy after tragedy and embracing the beauty of an unexpected life.

“Behind the Throne” by K.B. Wagers. In a world where the only safe options are fight or flight, Hail must rule.  Hail Bristol has made a name for herself in the galaxy for everything except what she was born to do: rule the Indranan Empire.  When she is dragged back to her home planet to take her rightful place as the only remaining heir, she finds that trading her ship for a palace is her most dangerous move yet.

“Dangerous Minds: A Knight and Moon Novel” by Janet Evanovich. Buddhist monk Wayan Bagus lost his island of solitude and wants to get it back. The island was about two hundred miles northeast of Samoa. It had a mountain, beaches, a rain forest, and a volcano. And now it’s gone. Poof! Vanished without a trace.

“The Force” by Don Winslow. Denny Malone “is ‘the King of Manhattan North,’ a, highly decorated NYPD detective sergeant and the real leader of ‘Da Force.’ Malone and his crew are the smartest, the toughest, the quickest, the bravest, and the baddest, an elite special unit given unrestricted authority to wage war on gangs, drugs and guns.

“Gwendy’s Button Box” by Stephen King & Richard T. Chizmar. There are three ways up to Castle View from the town of Castle Rock: Route 117, Pleasant Road, and the Suicide Stairs. Every day in the summer of 1974 twelve-year-old Gwendy Peterson has taken the stairs, which are held by strong (if time-rusted) iron bolts and zig-zag up the cliffside. A stranger calls to Gwendy: “Hey, girl. Come on over here for a bit. We ought to palaver, you and me.”

“Here and Gone” by Haylen Beck. It begins with a woman fleeing through Arizona with her kids in tow, trying to escape an abusive marriage. When she’s pulled over by an unsettling local sheriff, things soon go awry and she is taken into custody. Only when she gets to the station, her kids are gone. And then the cops start saying they never saw any kids with her, that if they’re gone than she must have done something with them…

“Lilac Girls” by Martha Hall Kelly. Caroline Ferriday, a socialite in New York, has her hands full with her post at the French consulate, but on the eve of a fateful war, her world is changed forever when Hitler’s army invades Poland in September, 1939; and then sets its sights on France. Kasia Kuzmerick, a Polish teenager, an ocean away from Caroline, senses her carefree youth disappearing as she is drawn deeper into her role as courier for the underground resistance movement. In a tense atmosphere of watchful eyes and suspcting neighbors, one false move can have dire consequences.

“Lost and Found Sisters” by Jill Shalvis. After losing her sister in a devastating car accident, sous-chef Quinn Weller is finally getting her life back on track. She appears to have it all: a loving family, a dream job in one of L.A.’s hottest eateries, and a gorgeous boyfriend dying to slip an engagement ring on her finger. So why does she feel so empty, like she’s looking for a missing piece she can’t find?

“Love Like Blood” by Mark Billingham. DI Nicola Tanner needs Tom Thorne’s help. Her partner, Susan, has been brutally murdered and Tanner is convinced that it was a case of mistaken identity–that she was the real target. The murderer’s motive might have something to do with Tanner’s recent work on a string of cold-case honor killings she believes to be related. Tanner is now on compassionate leave but insists on pursuing the case off the books and knows Thorne is just the man to jump into the fire with her.

“Our Little Racket” by Angelica Baker. On September 15, 2008, the world of Greenwich, Connecticut, is shaken. When the investment bank Weiss & Partners is shuttered, CEO Bob D’Amico must fend off allegations of malfeasance, as well as the judgment and resentment of his community. As panic builds, five women in his life must scramble to negotiate power on their own terms and ask themselves what –if anything–is worth saving.

“River with No Bridge” by Karen Wills. In frontier historical novel River with No Bridge, Nora Flanagan, at age eighteen, leaves Boston in 1882 to marry a miner in Butte, Montana. She anticipates achieving the respectability and security denied her as a tinker’s daughter in Ireland. Instead, she experiences tragedy, disgrace, and redemption. Three men love her: her husband who dies in a mine explosion; the secretive gambler who abandons her, leaving her pregnant; and half-Chinese Jim Li who becomes her life partner despite prejudice against them.

“The Silent Corner: A Novel of Suspense” by Dean R. Koontz. “”I very much need to be dead.” These are the chilling words left behind by a man who had everything to live for–but took his own life. In the void that remains stands his widow, Jane, surrounded by questions destined to go unanswered . . . unless she does what all the grief, fear, confusion, and fury inside of her demands: find the truth, no matter what”–

“The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter” by Theodora Gross. “Mary Jekyll, alone and penniless following her parents’ death, is curious about the secrets of her father’s mysterious past. One clue in particular hints that Edward Hyde, her father’s former friend and a murderer, may be nearby, and there is a reward for information leading to his capture–a reward that would solve all of her immediate financial woes.”

“Trap the Devil” by Ben Coes. A group of some of the most powerful people in the government, the military, and the private sector, has begun a brutal plan to quietly take over the reins of the U.S. government. They’ve begun to remove the people who stand in their way–and replace them with their own sympathizers and puppets. They’ve already taken out the Speaker of the House–whose death was made to look like an accidental drowning–and the president and vice president are next. Once they have their own people in place, they plan to start a bloody, brutal war on an unimaginable scale.

This is just a sampling of new books now available from any of the four branches of Josephine Community Libraries, thanks to funding from the Carpenter Foundation, the Meyer Memorial Trust, Grants Pass Friends of the Library, and donors like you and your neighbors.