New Adult Fiction for July

“The Best of Subterranean” by William K. Schafer. From its launch in 2005 to its final issue in 2014, “Subterranean” magazine published stories by the leading lights of science fiction and fantasy literature. From Hugo and Nebula winners to Pulitzer and Booker Prize finalists to “New York Times” bestsellers, this anthology collects 30 pieces of “Subterranean’s” best, representing diverse, breathtaking short fiction from today’s modern masters.

“Careers for Women” by Joanna Scott. Working for the New York Port Authority in the late 1950s under the tutelage of a legendary publicist, Maggie Gleason befriends her boss’s newest protege, who goes missing amid rumors about a devastating secret from the past.

“Deadfall” by Linda Fairstein. Hunting a killer within New York’s urban jungle becomes the biggest case of Alexandra Cooper’s career inNew York Timesbestselling author Linda Fairstein’s latest riveting thriller. A wild heart beats within New York City. Amid concrete and skyscrapers, the Wildlife Conservation Society works to preserve and protect the animal kingdom both within and beyond the borders of the five boroughs. But dangerous creatures don’t always have claws and fangs, as Assistant DA Alexandra Cooper and NYPD detectives Mike Chapman and Mercer Wallace know all too well.

“Fierce Kingdom” by Gin Phillips, audiobook read by Cassandra Campbell. The zoo is nearly empty as Joan and her four-year-old son soak up the last few moments of playtime. They are happy, and the day has been close to perfect. But what Joan sees as she hustles her son toward the exit gate minutes before closing time sends her sprinting back into the zoo, her child in her arms. And for the next three hours–the entire scope of the novel–she keeps on running. Suddenly, mother and son are as trapped as the animals.

“Gather the Daughters” by Jennie Melamed. Girls in an insular community on an island at the end of the world start to question the rules that bind them. Years ago, just before the country was incinerated to wasteland, ten men and their families colonized an island off the coast. They built a radical society of ancestor worship, controlled breeding, and the strict rationing of knowledge and history. Only the Wanderers–chosen male descendants of the original ten–are allowed to cross to the wastelands, where they scavenge for detritus among the still-smoldering fires.

“Let the Dead Speak” by Jane Casey. When eighteen-year-old Chloe Emery returns to her West London home she finds her mother missing, the house covered in blood. Everything points to murder, except for one thing: there’s no sign of the body. London detective Maeve Kerrigan and the homicide team turn their attention to the neighbours. The ultra-religious Norrises are acting suspiciously; their teenage daughter and Chloe Emery definitely have something to hide

“The Lost Ones” by Sheena Kamal. It begins with a phone call that Nora Watts has dreaded for fifteen years–since the day she gave her newborn daughter up for adoption. Bonnie has vanished. The police consider her a chronic runaway and aren’t looking, leaving her desperate adoptive parents to reach out to her birth mother as a last hope. A biracial product of the foster system, transient, homeless, scarred by a past filled with pain and violence, Nora knows intimately what happens to vulnerable girls on the streets

“The Lying Game” by Ruth Ware. On a cool June morning, a woman is walking her dog in the idyllic coastal village of Salten along a tidal estuary known as the Reach. Before she can stop him, the dog charges into the water to retrieve what first appears to be a wayward stick, but to her horror, turns out to be something much more sinister. The next morning, three women in and around London–Fatima, Thea, and Isabel–receive the text they had always hoped would NEVER come, from the fourth in their formerly inseparable clique, Kate, that says only, “I need you.”

“The Marriage Pact” by Michelle Richmond. Picture-perfect newlyweds Alice and Jake are unexpectedly initiated into a mysterious organization designed to keep marriages happy and intact through seemingly sensible rules that become increasingly exacting and subject to brutal enforcement.

“The Painted Queen” by Elizabeth Peters. Arriving in Cairo for another thrilling excavation season, Amelia is relaxing in a well-earned bubble bath in her elegant hotel suite in Cairo, when a man with knife protruding from his back staggers into the bath chamber and utters a single word–“Murder”–before collapsing on the tiled floor, dead. Among the few possessions he carried was a sheet of paper with Amelia’s name and room number, and a curious piece of pasteboard the size of a calling card bearing one word: “Judas.”

“Paradise Valley” by C.J. Box. For three years, Investigator Cassie Dewell has been on a hunt for a serial killer known as the Lizard King whose hunting grounds are the highways and truck stops where runaways and prostitutes are most likely to vanish. Cassie almost caught him…once. Working for the Bakken County, North Dakota sheriff’s department, Cassie has set what she believes is the perfect trap and she has lured him and his truck to a depot. But the plan goes horribly wrong, and the blame falls on Cassie

“Penance of the Damned” by Peter Tremayne. Ireland, AD 671. King Colgu of Cashel is shocked to learn that his loyal Chief Bishop and advisor has been murdered in the old enemy fortress of the Ui Fidgente. When word reaches Cashel that the culprit will be executed under new law, a larger conflict looms.

“Talon of God” by Wesley Snipes. Imagine that everyone you have ever known or loved was forced against their will into a state of demonic possession and spiritual slavery. Imagine an unholy cabal of the world’s richest and most powerful men directing this sinister plan in order to cement their unbridled control of the planet. Imagine two heroes emerging from that darkness to do battle with the forces of evil.

“The Wildling Sisters” by Eve Chase. An evocative novel in the vein of Kate Morton and Daphne Du Maurier, in which the thrill of first love clashes with the bonds of sisterhood, and all will be tested by the dark secret at the heart of Applecote Manor.

“A Distant View of Everything” by Alexander McCall Smith. When a matchmaker begins to question her latest match, Isabel Dalhousie is called upon to help. A new baby brings an abundance of joy to Isabel and her husband, Jamie–but almost-four-year-old Charlie is none too keen on his newborn brother. In fact, he refuses to acknowledge Magnus, and Isabel must find a way to impress upon her older son the patience and understanding that have served as guiding principles in her own life. These are the very qualities that bring Bea Shandon, an old acquaintance of Isabel’s, to seek her help in a tricky situation.

“Grace” by Paul Lynch. A sweeping, Dickensian story of a young girl on a life-changing journey across nineteenth-century Ireland on the eve of the Great Famine   Early one October morning, Grace’s mother snatches her from sleep and brutally cuts off her hair, declaring, “You are the strong one now.” With winter close at hand and Ireland already suffering, Grace is no longer safe at home. And so her mother outfits her in men’s clothing and casts her out.

“Some Kind of Hero” by Suzanne Brockman. Former Navy SEAL Peter “Grunge” Greene’s lonely but comfortable life is upended when his longtime ex-girlfriend unexpectedly dies in a car crash, leaving him sole custody of their 15-year-old daughter, Maddie. They move to San Diego to start a new life together, but Maddie quickly falls in with the wrong crowd and soon goes completely AWOL. New to town with no one to turn to, Peter is frantic to track down his daughter and accepts help from his beautiful and surprisingly resourceful neighbor, Shayla Whitman.

“The Bane Chronicles” by Cassandra Clare. Fans of The Mortal Instruments and The Infernal Devices can get to know warlock Magnus Bane like never before in this paperback collection of  New York Times  bestselling tales, each with comic-style art.  This collection of eleven short stories illuminates the life of the enigmatic Magnus Bane, whose alluring personality, flamboyant style, and sharp wit populate the pages of the #1  New York Times  bestselling series, The Mortal Instruments and The Infernal Devices.

“Blame” by Jeff Abbott. Two years ago, Jane Norton crashed her car on a lonely road, killing her friend David and leaving her with amnesia. At first, everyone was sympathetic. Then they found Jane’s note: I wish we were dead together. A girl to blame… From that day the town turned against her. But even now Jane is filled with questions: Why were they on that road? Why was she with David? Did she really want to die?

“The Breakdown” by B.A. Paris. Audiobook read by Georgia Maguire. Cass is having a hard time since the night she saw the car in the woods with the woman sitting inside–the woman who was killed. She’s been trying to put the crime out of her mind; what could she have done, really? It’s a dangerous road to be on in the middle of a storm. Her husband would be furious if he knew she’d broken her promise not to take that shortcut home. And she probably would only have been hurt herself if she’d stopped.

“The Epiphany Machine” by David Burr Gerrard. Everyone else knows the truth about you, now you can know it, too. That’s the slogan. The product: a junky contraption that tattoos personalized revelations on its users’ forearms. It’s an old con, playing on the fear that we are obvious to everybody except ourselves. This particular one’s been circulating New York since the 1960s. The ad works. And, oddly enough, so might the device.

“The Late Show” by Michael Connelly. Renaee Ballard works the night shift in Hollywood, beginning many investigations but finishing none as each morning she turns her cases over to day shift detectives. A once up-and-coming detective, she’s been given this beat as punishment after filing a sexual harassment complaint against a supervisor. But one night she catches two cases she doesn’t want to part with: the brutal beating of a prostitute left for dead in a parking lot and the killing of a young woman in a nightclub shooting

“Less” by Andrew Sean Greer. You are a failed novelist about to turn fifty. A wedding invitation arrives in the mail: your boyfriend of the past nine years is engaged to someone else. You can’t say yes–it would be too awkward–and you can’t say no–it would look like defeat. On your desk are a series of invitations to half-baked literary events around the world. Question: How do you arrange to skip town? Answer: You accept them all. What would possibly go wrong

“The Library of Light and Shadow” by M.J. Rose. In this riveting and richly drawn novel a talented young artist flees New York for the South of France after one of her scandalous drawings reveals a dark secret–and triggers a terrible tragedy. In the wake of a dark and brutal World War, the glitz and glamour of 1925 Manhattan shine like a beacon for the high society set, desperate to keep their gaze firmly fixed to the future. But Delphine Duplessi sees more than most.

“Look Behind You” by Iris Johansen. A serial killer is on the loose in San Diego, and he has a most unusual M.O.: With each kill, he leaves behind objects with unclear meanings. Most of the recent killings are centered near Kendra Michaels’ home and office, so it comes as no great surprise when the FBI shows up at her door. The investigators soon make a startling discovery: the left-behind objects are actually souvenirs of other unsolved serial murder cases in various

“Soul Cage” by Tetsuya Honda. A worker reports his boss missing, and a large amount of blood is found in the rented garage he used. At the same time, a severed left hand is found in a minivan abandoned in the outskirts of Tokyo, which is quickly identified as belonging to this missing man, Kenichi Takaoka. Lt. Reiko Himekawa of the Homicide Division of the Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department is assigned to the investigation, along with her squad and several other units.

“Escaping Indigo” by Eli Lang. Micah thought he’d always be in a band. All he ever wanted was to play drums and make great music, but when his best friend and bandmate passes away, Micah is left adrift. The thing that’s always lifted him up is now a reminder of everything he’s lost. In an attempt to put his life back together, Micah takes a job as roadie for his favorite band, Escaping Indigo. He’s always admired the lead singer, Bellamy.

“What We Lose” by Zinzi Clemmons. Raised in Pennsylvania, Thandi views the world of her mother’s childhood in Johannesburg as both impossibly distant and ever present. She is an outsider wherever she goes, caught between being black and white, American and not. She tries to connect these dislocated pieces of her life, and as her mother succumbs to cancer, Thandi searches for an anchor–someone, or something, to love.

“Murder at the Male Revue” by Elizabeth Perona. When Mary Ruth’s company is hired to cater a fundraiser featuring the Royal Buckingham Male Dance Revue, the ladies see the chance to cross another item off their bucket list: helping divorcee Joy McQueen get over her decades-old fear of men in the buff. But when fundraiser sponsor Camille Ledfelter is stabbed to death, the women must uncover the naked truth about who wanted her dead.

“The Little Old Lady Who Struck Lucky Again!” by C. Ingelman-Sundberg. Translated by Rod Bradbury. Martha Andersson and her friends are at it again. Having left behind their restrictive senior home in Stockholm, the gang is off to make it big in the bright lights and big money of The Strip. Armed with electric wheelchairs and some well-placed helium balloons, Martha, The Genius, The Rake, Christina, and Anna-Gretta are ready to take a Vegas casino for all it’s worth, cashing in on their new favorite pastime: white collar crime.

“Another Brooklyn” by Jaqueline Woodson. For August, running into a long-ago friend sets in motion resonant memories, and transports her to a time and place she thought she had mislaid: 1970s Brooklyn, where friendship was everything.   August, Sylvia, Angela, and Gigi shared confidences as they ambled their neighborhood streets, a place where the girls believed that they were amazingly beautiful, brilliantly talented, with a future that belonged to them.   But beneath the hopeful promise there was another Brooklyn, a dangerous place.

“The Jane Austen Project” by Kathleen A. Flynn. This debut novel “offers an unusual twist on the legacy of one of the world’s most celebrated and beloved authors: two researchers from the future are sent back in time to meet Jane and recover a suspected unpublished novel”–

“Compass” by Mathias Enard. Translated by Charlotte Mandell. Winner of the 2015 Prix Goncourt, an astounding novel that bridges Europe and the Islamic world. This astonishing, encyclopedic, and otherwise outre meditation by Enard on the cultural intersection of East and West takes the form of an insomniac’s obsessive imaginings–dreams, memories, and desires–which come to embody the content of a life, or perhaps several. An opium addict’s dream of a novel.

“Scythe” by Neal Shusterman. In a world where disease has been eliminated, the only way to die is to be randomly killed (‘gleaned’) by professional reapers (‘scythes’). Two teens must compete with each other to become a scythe–a position neither of them wants. The one who becomes a scythe must kill the one who doesn’t.

“A Terrible Beauty” by Tasha Alexander. Lady Emily retreats to her villa on the island of Santorini for a brief respite from London. But when she arrives, the housekeeper informs her that the master of the house has returned–Emily’s first husband, who died a decade earlier.

“The Billionaire Bachelor” by Jessica Lemmon. Manwhore. That’s what the board of directors–and the tabloids–thinks of billionaire bachelor Reese Crane. Ordinarily he couldn’t care less, but his playboy past is preventing the board from naming him CEO of Crane Hotels. Nothing–and no one–will keep him from his life’s legacy. They want a settled man to lead the company? Then that’s exactly what he’ll give them.

“The Watch That Ends the Night: Voices from the Titanic” by Allan Wolf. Arrogance and innocence, hubris and hope–twenty-four haunting voices of the Titanic tragedy, as well as the iceberg itself, are evoked in a stunning tour de force.   Millionaire John Jacob Astor hopes to bring home his pregnant teen bride with a minimum of media scandal. A beautiful Lebanese refugee, on her way to family in Florida, discovers the first stirrings of love. And an ancient iceberg glides south, anticipating its fateful encounter.

“House of Spies” by Daniel Silva. Four months after the deadliest attack on the American homeland since 9/11, terrorists leave a trail of carnage through London’s glittering West End. The attack is a brilliant feat of planning and secrecy, but with one loose thread. The thread leads Gabriel Allon and his team of operatives to the south of France and to the gilded doorstep of Jean-Luc Martel and Olivia Watson. A beautiful former British fashion model, Olivia pretends not to know that the true source of Martel’s enormous wealth is drugs.

“Down a Dark Road” by Linda Castillo. Eight years ago Joseph King was convicted of murdering his wife and sentenced to life in prison. He was a ‘fallen’ Amish man and, according to local law enforcement, a known drug user with a violent temper. Now King has escaped, and he’s headed for Painters Mill. News of a murderer on the loose travels like wildfire, putting Chief of Police Kate Burkholder and her team of officers on edge.

“Watch Me Disappear” by Janelle Brown. A beautiful Berkeley mom with a radical past vanishes while hiking, leaving her family to piece together her secrets, in this keenly observed novel for readers of Emma Straub and Maria Semple–from the bestselling author of All We Ever Wanted Was Everything

“Final Girls” by Riley Sager. Ten years ago, college student Quincy Carpenter went on vacation with five friends and came back alone, the only survivor of a horror movie-scale massacre. In an instant, she became a member of a club no one wants to belong–a group of similar survivors known in the press as the Final Girls. Now, Quincy is doing well. That is, until Lisa, the first Final Girl, is found dead in her bathtub, wrists slit, and Sam, the second, appears on Quincy’s doorstep.

“Dark Saturday” by Nicci French. A decade ago, 18-year-old Hannah Docherty was arrested for the shocking murder of her family. It was an open-and-shut case, and Hannah has been incarcerated in a secure psychiatric hospital ever since. When psychotherapist Frieda Klein is asked to meet Hannah and give her assessment, she reluctantly agrees. But what she finds horrifies her. Hannah has become a tragic figure, old before her time.

“Hum If You Don’t Know the Words” by Biana Marais. Life under apartheid has created a secure future for Robin Conrad, a ten-year-old white girl living with her parents in 1970s Johannesburg. In the same nation but worlds apart, Beauty Mbali, a Xhosa woman in a rural village in the Bantu homeland of the Transkei, struggles to raise her children alone after her husband’s death. Both lives have been built upon the division of race, and their meeting should never have occurred.

“Refuge: A Novel: by Dina Nayeri. An Iranian girl escapes to America as a child, but her father stays behind. Over twenty years, as she transforms from confused immigrant to overachieving Westerner to sophisticated European transplant, daughter and father know each other only from their visits: four crucial visits over two decades, each in a different international city. The longer they are apart, the more their lives diverge, but also the more each comes to need the other’s wisdom and, ultimately, rescue.

“The Third Nero” by Lindsey Davis. In 90 A.D., following the Saturninus revolt in Germany, the Emperor Domitian has become more paranoid about traitors and dissenters around him. This leads to several senators and even provincial governors facing charges and being executed for supposed crimes of conspiracy and insulting the emperor. Wanting to root out all the supports of Saturninus from the Senate, one of Domitian’s men offers to hire Flavia Alba to do some intelligence work.

“Conversations with Friends” Sally Rooney. Frances is a cool-headed and darkly observant young woman, vaguely pursuing a career in writing while studying in Dublin. Her best friend and comrade-in-arms is the beautiful and endlessly self-possessed Bobbi. At a local poetry performance one night, Frances and Bobbi catch the eye of Melissa, a well-known photographer, and as the girls are then gradually drawn into Melissa’s world, Frances is reluctantly impressed by the older woman’s sophisticated home and tall, handsome husband, Nick.

“Live from Cairo” by Ian Bassingthwaighte. Cairo, 2011. President Mubarak has just been ousted from power. The oldest city in the world is reeling from political revolution, its consequent hopes and fears, its violence, triumphs, and defeats. But for the people actually living there, daily life has not slowed down but become wilder, more dangerous, and, occasionally, freeing.

“Gork, the Teenage Dragon” by Gabe Hudson. Gork isn’t like the other dragons at WarWings Military Academy. He has a gigantic heart, two-inch horns, and an occasional problem with fainting. His nickname is Weak Sauce and his Will to Power ranking is Snacklicious–the lowest in his class. But he is determined not to let any of this hold him back as he embarks on the most important mission of his life: tonight, on the eve of his high school graduation, he must ask a female dragon to be his queen”–

“Moving Kings” by Joshua Cohen. The year is 2015, and twenty-one-year-olds Yoav and Uri, veterans of the last Gaza War, have just completed their compulsory military service in the Israel Defense Forces. In keeping with national tradition, they take a year off for rest, recovery, and travel. They come to New York City and begin working for Yoav’s distant cousin David King–a proud American patriot, Republican, and Jew.

“Secret Sisters” by Joy Callaway. Illinois, 1881: Whitsitt College sophomore Beth Carrington has two goals to fulfill by the time she graduates: obtain a medical degree, and establish a women’s fraternity, Beta Xi Beta, that will help young women like herself to connect with and support one another while attending the male-dominated Whitsitt. Neither is an easy task. The sole female student in the physicians’ program, Beth is constantly called out by her professors and peers for having the audacity not to concentrate on a more “fitting” subject like secretarial studies.

“Bed-Stuy Is Burning” by Brian Platzer. Aaron, a disgraced rabbi turned Wall Street banker, and Amelia, his journalist girlfriend, live with their newborn in Bedford-Stuyvesant, one of the most rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods in New York City. The infusion of upwardly mobile strivers into Bed-Stuy’s historic brownstones belies the tension simmering on the streets below. But after a cop shoots a boy in a nearby park, a riot erupts–with Aaron and his family at its center.

“Penhale Wood: A Mystery” Julia Thomas. On a cold December night in Cornwall, nanny Karen Peterson disappeared with three-year-old Sophie Flynn. The next day, the child’s body was found on a riverbank in Penhale Wood. A year later, Sophie’s mother, Iris Flynn, appears on the doorstep of investigating officer Rob McIntyre, determined to make him reopen her daughter’s case. McIntyre has his own personal demons, but Iris hijacks his life in order to find the woman she thinks is responsible for Sophie’s death.

“Death on Delos” by Gary Corby. Greece, 545 BC: It is illegal to die on the sacred isle of Delos. It’s also illegal to give birth there. Yet when murder is committed, the only available detective to solve the crime is the priestess Diotima, and she is heavily pregnant. Delos is the holy birthplace of the divine twins Apollo and Artemis, and it is an island in crisis. Not only has murder tainted the holy sanctuary, but there are about a thousand Athenian troops on the island.

“Dark Sky” by Mike Brooks. When Ichabod Drift and the Keiko crew sign on for a new smuggling job to a mining planet, they don’t realize what they are up against. The miners, badly treated for years by the corporation, are staging a rebellion. Split into two groups, one with the authorities and one with the rebels, Drift and his crew support their respective sides in the conflict. But when they are cut off from each other due to a communication blackout, both halves of the crew don’t realize that they have begun fighting themselves.

“A Kiss Before Doomsday” by Laurence Macnaughton. Light on angst and heavy on banter in a world where the four horsemen of the apocalypse drive muscle cars, this fresh urban fantasy plays with some of the tropes of the genre, with a heroine more likely to consult a book than swing a sword.

“Camino Island” by John Grisham. Bruce Cable owns a popular bookstore in the sleepy resort town of Santa Rosa on Camino Island in Florida. He makes his real money, though, as a prominent dealer in rare books. A generous offer of money convinces Mercer Mann to go undercover and infiltrate Bruce Cable’s circle of literary friends, ideally getting close enough to him to learn his secrets. But eventually Mercer learns far too much.

“Beach House for Rent” by Mary Alice Munroe. When Cara Rutledge rents out her quaint beach house on Isle of Palms to Heather, it’s a win-win by any standard: Cara’s generating income necessary to keep husband Brett’s ecotourism boat business afloat, and anxiety-prone Heather, an young artist who’s been given a commission to paint birds on postage stamps, has a quiet space in which to work and tend to her pet canaries uninterrupted.

“Kiss Carlo” by Adriana Trigiani. It’s 1949 and South Philadelphia bursts with opportunity during the post-war boom. The Palazzini Cab Company & Western Union Telegraph Office, owned and operated by Dominic Palazzini and his three sons, is flourishing.. But a decades-long feud that split Dominic and his brother Mike and their once-close families sets the stage for a re-match.

“Nighthawk” by Clive Cussler. NUMA crew leaders Kurt Austin and Joe Zavala must beat the clock to stop the world’s most dazzling new technological advance from becoming mankind’s last in this action-packed thriller from the #1 New York Times-bestselling grand master of adventure.

“Love Story” by Karen Kingsbury. Decades ago, John and Elizabeth Baxter lived a love story that is still playing out in the lives of their adult children and grandchildren. Now in high school, Ashley Baxter Blake’s oldest son, Cole, must write a family history paper for a freshman English class. He decides to interview his grandfather about that long ago love story. John is hesitant, not sure if he can take the sorrow of reliving his love story with Elizabeth–especially now that he is remarried.

“Tom Clancy Point of Contact” by Mike Maden. “In the latest electrifying adventure in Tom Clancy’s #1New York Times bestselling series, Jack Ryan, Jr., learns that sometimes the deadliest secret may be standing right next to you. Former U.S. Senator Weston Rhodes is a defense contractor with an urgent problem. His company needs someone to look over the books of Dalfan Technologies, a Singapore company–quickly.

“Wired” by Julie Garwood. Allison Trent doesn’t look like a hacker. But behind her gorgeous face is a brilliant mind for computers and her real love is writing–and hacking–code. Her dream is to write a new security program that could revolutionize the tech industry. Hotshot FBI agent Liam Scott has a problem. He needs the skills of a top-notch hacker to work on a highly sensitive project: to secretly break into the FBI servers and find out who the traitor is.

“A Game of Ghosts” by John Connolly. It is deep winter and the darkness is unending. A private detective named Jaycob Eklund has vanished and Charlie Parker is assigned to track him down. Parker’s employer, Edgar Ross, an agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, has his own reasons for wanting Eklund found. Eklund is no ordinary investigator–he is obsessively tracking a series of homicides and disappearances, each linked to reports of hauntings.

“Midnight Jewel” by Richelle Mead. A refugee of war, Mira was cast out of her home country and thrust into another. In a life-altering twist of fate, she’s given the chance to escape once more, and she takes it, joining the Glittering Court. By day, she goes through the motions, learning the etiquette and customs that will help to earn her anonymity, even making a couple true friends in the process: the forthright ladies’ maid Adelaide and the ambitious laundress Tamsin.

“Persons Unknown” by Susie Steiner. As dusk falls, a young man staggers through a park, far from home, bleeding from a stab wound. He dies where he falls, cradled by a stranger, a woman’s name on his lips in his last seconds of life. Detective Manon Bradshaw handles only cold cases. Five months pregnant, in pursuit of a work-life balance rather than romantic love, she’s focused on being a good mother to her two children.

“South Pole Station” by Ashley Shelby. Cooper Gosling is adrift at thirty, unmoored by a family tragedy and floundering in her career as a painter. So she applies to the National Science Foundation Artists & Writers Program and flees to Antarctica–the bottom of the Earth–where she encounters a group of misfits motivated by desires as ambiguous as her own

“The Reluctant Queen” by Sarah Beth Durst. Not long ago, Daleina used her strength and skill to survive those spirits and assume the royal throne. Since then, the new queen has kept the peace and protected the humans of her land. But now for all her power, she is hiding a terrible secret: she is dying. And if she leaves the world before a new heir is ready, the spirits that inhabit her beloved realm will run wild, destroying her cities and slaughtering her people.

“The Last Hack: A Jack Parlabane Thriller” by Christopher Brookmyre. From a top international crime writer, an unstoppable thriller about an old-school journalist facing down obsolescence, a desperate teenager, and a heist that will take this unlikely pair to the most treacherous corners of the Internet.

“All We Shall Know” by Donal Ryan. Melody Shee is alone and in trouble. At 33 years-old, she finds herself pregnant with the child of a 17 year-old Traveller boy, Martin Toppy, and not by her husband Pat. Melody was teaching Martin to read, but now he’s gone, and Pat leaves too, full of rage. She’s trying to stay in the moment, but the future is looming, while the past won’t let her go.

“Egypt’s Sister” by Angela Hunt. Chava, the Jewish daughter of a royal tutor, vowed to be faithful to her childhood friend Queen Cleopatra. But after they argue, Chava is ripped from her family and her privileged life and sold into slavery. When she finds herself alone in Rome, she must choose between love and honor, between her own desires and God’s will.

“Rather Be the Devil” by Ian Rankin. Audiobook read by James MacPherson. John Rebus, as incapable of settling into his retirement as he is of playing by the rules, investigates a cold case from the 1970s involving a gorgeous and wealthy female socialite who was found dead in a bedroom at one of Edinburgh’s most luxurious hotels. No one was ever found guilty, and the crime has been largely forgotten.

“City of Masks: A Somershill Manor Novel” by S.D. Sykes. Young Lord Somershill flees England for the wonders of Venice, where he becomes involved in a bizarre murder investigation that plunges him into the depths of this secretive medieval city.

“The Lake” by Lotte & Soren Hammer. The skeleton of a young woman is discovered, tied to a stone, in a lake deep in the Danish countryside. The woman’s identity is a mystery; no one matching her description has been reported missing. After months of fruitless investigation by the local police force, a media scandal brings the case to nationwide attention and is quickly handed over to Konrad Simonsen and his team from the Copenhagen police force.

“The State Counsellor: A Fandorin Mystery” by B. Akunin. Russia, 1891. The new governor-general of Siberia has been secreted away on a train from St. Petersburg to Moscow. A blizzard rages outside as a mustachioed official climbs aboard near the city; with his trademark stutter, he introduces himself as State Counsellor Erast Fandorin. He then thrusts a dagger inscribed with the initials CG into the governor-general’s heart and, tearing off his mustache, escapes out the carriage window.

“Child of My Winter” by Andrew Lanh. Rick van Lam is bui doi, “a child of dust,” as the Vietnamese scornfully called a mixed-blood kid whose father was an unknown American GI. But Rick was lucky-in time he was sent to America. And he’s ended up in Hartford, Connecticut, where he’s made a life as a private eye after leaving a career as a cop at the NYPD. One night as a blizzard strikes, a professor is shot down in the campus parking lot…

 

This is just a sampling of new books now available from any of the four branches of Josephine Community Libraries, thanks to funding from the Carpenter Foundation, the Meyer Memorial Trust, Grants Pass Friends of the Library, and donors like you and your neighbors.