New Nonfiction for August

“The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African American Culinary History in the Old South” by Michael W. Twitty. Southern food is integral to the American culinary tradition, yet the question of who “owns” it is one of the most provocative touch points in our ongoing struggles over race. In this unique memoir, culinary historian Michael W. Twitty takes readers to the white-hot center of this fight, tracing the roots of his own family and the charged politics surrounding the origins of soul food, barbecue, and all Southern cuisine.

“From Holmes to Sherlock: The Story of the Men and Women Who Created an Icon” by Mattias Bostroem. Everyone knows Sherlock Holmes. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle created a unique literary character who has remained popular for over a century and is appreciated more than ever today. But what made this fictional character, dreamed up by a small-town English doctor in the 1880s, into such a lasting success, despite the author’s own attempt to escape his invention?

“He’s Not Lazy: Empowering Your Son to Believe in Himself” by Adam Price. On the surface, capable teenage boys may look lazy. But dig a little deeper, writes child psychologist Adam Price in  He’s Not Lazy , and you’ll often find conflicted boys who want to do well in middle and high school but are afraid to fail, and so do not try. This book can help you become an ally with your son, as he discovers greater self-confidence and accepts responsibility for his future.

“The Hot One: A Memoir of Friendship, Sex, and Murder” by Carolyn Murnick. As girls growing up in rural New Jersey in the late 1980s, Ashley and Carolyn had everything in common: two outsiders who loved spending afternoons exploring the woods. Only when the girls attended different high schools did they begin to grow apart. While Carolyn struggled to fit in, Ashley quickly became a hot girl: popular, extroverted, and sexually precocious.

“Lights On, Rats Out: A Memoir” by Cree LeFavour. As a young college graduate a year into treatment with a psychiatrist, Cree LeFavour began to organize her days around the cruel, compulsive logic of self-harm: with each newly lit cigarette, the world would drop away as her focus narrowed on the blooming release of pleasure-pain as the burning tip was applied to an unblemished patch of skin. Her body was a canvas of cruelty; each scar a mark of pride and shame.

“Make Great Art on Your iPad” by Alison Jardine. Innovative in scope, Make Great Art on Your iPad is structured around the classic genres of art, such as still life, landscape painting, portraits, and perspective. Often iPad art is associated only with the graphic and illustrative arts found in genres such as video games. This book is grounded firmly in the traditions of the fine art world.

“Morningstar: Growing Up with Books” by Ann Hood. Growing up in a mill town in Rhode Island, in a household that didn’t foster a love of literature, Hood discovered nonetheless the transformative power of books. She learned to channel her imagination, ambitions, and curiosity by devouring ever-growing stacks. In Morningstar, Hood recollects how “The Bell Jar,” “Marjorie Morningstar,” “The Harrad Experiment,” and “The Outsiders” influenced her teen psyche and introduced her to topics that could not be discussed at home: desire, fear, sexuality, and madness.

“Simply Redwork: Embroidery the Hugs ‘n Kisses Way” by Helen Stubbings. Revisit a classic style and create eye-catching projects with modern appeal. Clear instructions and stitch guides will give you the basics you need to easily create redwork patterns that are simple, charming and fun. With stunning, inspirational images of each project, author Helen Stubbings of Hugs ‘n Kisses(R) provides 19 projects you can create and share. Projects include a change purse, a penny square quilt, home and seasonal decor.

“What Made Maddy Run: The Secret Struggles and Tragic Death of an All-American Teen” by Kate Fagan. A sports journalist relates the story of Ivy League freshman and track star Maddy Holleran, who seemingly had it all and succeeded at everything she tried, but who secretly grappled with mental illness before taking her own life during the spring semester. This is the story of Maddy Holleran’s life, and her struggle with depression, which also reveals the mounting pressures young people, and college athletes in particular, face to be perfect, especially in an age of relentless connectivity and social media saturation.

“Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Storming of the Presidency” by Joshua Green. Based on dozens of interviews conducted over six years, Green spins the master narrative of the 2016 campaign from its origins in the far fringes of right-wing politics and reality television to its culmination inside Trump’s penthouse on election night. Any study of Trump’s rise to the presidency is unavoidably a study of Bannon. “Devil’s Bargain” is a tour-de-force telling of the remarkable confluence of circumstances that decided the election.

“Rediscovering Americanism: And the Tyranny of Progressivism” by Mark R. Levin. In  “Rediscovering Americanism,” Mark R. Levin revisits the founders’ warnings about the perils of overreach by the federal government and concludes that the men who created our country would be outraged and disappointed to see where we’ve ended up.  Levin returns to the impassioned question he’s explored in each of his bestselling books:  How do we save our exceptional country?  Because our values are in such a precarious state, he argues that a restoration to the essential truths on which our country was founded has never been more urgent.

“The Swamp: Washington’s Murky Pool of Corruption and Cronyism and How Trump Can Drain It” by Eric Bolling. In “The Swamp,” bestselling author and Fox News Channel host Eric Bolling presents an infuriating, amusing, revealing, and outrageous history of American politics, past and present, Republican and Democrat. From national political scandals to tempests in a teapot that blew up; bribery, blackmail, bullying, and backroom deals that contradicted public policies; cronyism that cost taxpayers hundreds upon hundreds of millions of dollars; and personal conduct that can only be described as regrettable, “The Swamp” is a journey downriver through the bayous and marshes of Capitol Hill and Foggy Bottom.

“The Operator: Firing the Shots That Killed Osama Bin Laden and My Years as a Seal Team Warrior” by Robert O’Neill. A memoir that “ranges across SEAL Team Operator Robert O’Neill’s … four-hundred-mission career, which included his involvement in attempts to rescue ‘Lone Survivor’ Marcus Luttrell and abducted-by-Somali-pirates Captain Richard Phillips and which culminated in those famous three shots that dispatched the world’s most wanted terrorist,

“Mt. Rushmore and Keystone” by Tom Domek. In the heart of a geological upthrust, four presidents, memorialized in granite, gaze across the rugged country of South Dakota’s Black Hills. In this book, readers will find vintage photographs–many never before published–that, along with engaging narrative, tell the story of Keystone and the carving of Mount Rushmore.

“The Arena: Inside the Tailgating, Ticket-Scalping, Mascot-Racing, Dubiously Funded, and Possibly Haunted Monuments of American Sport” by Rafi Kohan. Riotous fan behavior, behind-the-scenes machinations, and madcap histories dominate in this unrivaled exploration of the modern American sports stadium.

“Be a Hero: The Essential Survival Guide to Active-Shooter Events” by John Geddes and Alun Rees. It’s never going to be you. Then one day you hear the clatter of automatic fire at the mall. You have been drawn into the chaos and terror of an active shooter event. What do you do? Who do you turn to? “Be a Hero” is the essential guide to terrorist attacks that will help you survive. Former Special Air Service terror expert John Geddes will explain how to cope with a life-threatening event. He shows you how to make clear decisions and beat the odds.

“Being the Change: Live Well and Spark a Climate Revolution” by Peter Kalmus. Alarmed by drastic changes now occurring in the Earth’s climate systems, the author, a climate scientist and suburban father of two, embarked on a journey to change his life and the world. He began by bicycling, growing food, meditating, and making other simple, fulfilling changes. Ultimately, he slashed his climate impact to under a tenth of the US average and became happier in the process.

“The Bettencourt Affair: The World’s Richest Woman and the Scandal That Rocked Paris” by Tom Sancton. Heiress to the nearly forty-billion-dollar L’Oreal fortune, Liliane Bettencourt is the world’s richest woman and the fourteenth wealthiest person. But her gilded life has taken a dark yet fascinating turn in the past decade. At ninety-four, she’s now embroiled in what has been called the Bettencourt Affair, a scandal that dominated the headlines in France. Why?

“The Day Will Pass Away: The Diary of a Gulag Prison Guard: 1935-1936” by Ivan Chistyakov. A rare first-person testimony of the hardships of a Soviet labor camp–long suppressed–that will become a cornerstone of understanding the Soviet Union.

“Ignore It!: How Selectively Looking the Other Way Can Decrease Behavioral Problems and Increase Parenting Satisfaction” by Catherine Pearlman. Too often we find ourselves bargaining, debating, arguing and pleading with kids. Instead of improved behavior parents are ensuring that the behavior will not only continue but often get worse. When children receive no attention or reward for misbehavior, they realize their ways of acting are ineffective and cease doing it.

“Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance, and the Future of Evolution” by Jonathan B. Losos. Earth’s natural history is full of fascinating instances of convergence: phenomena like eyes and wings and tree-climbing lizards that have evolved independently, multiple times. But evolutionary biologists also point out many examples of contingency, cases where the tiniest change–a random mutation or an ancient butterfly sneeze–caused evolution to take a completely different course. Jonathan Losos reveals what the latest breakthroughs in evolutionary biology can tell us about one of the greatest ongoing debates in science.

“The Kelloggs: The Battling Brothers of Battle Creek” by Howard Markel. John Harvey Kellogg was one of America’s most beloved physicians; a best-selling author, lecturer, and health-magazine publisher; founder of the Battle Creek Sanitarium; and patron saint of the pursuit of wellness. His youngest brother Will was the founder of the Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company, which revolutionized the mass production of food and what we eat for breakfast.

“Of Mess and Moxie: Wrangling Delight Out of This Wild and Glorious Life” by Jen Hatmaker. New York Times bestselling author, Big Sister Emeritus, and Chief BFF Jen Hatmaker returns with another round of hilarious tales, shameless honesty, and hope for the woman who has forgotten her moxie.

“Playing Hurt: My Journey from Despair to Hope” by John Saunders. A candid and revealing memoir about confronting a crippling disease, by the host of ESPN s Sports Reporters and ABC s college football.

“Science in the Soul: Selected Writings of a Passionate Rationalist” by Richard Dawkins. The legendary biologist and bestselling author mounts a timely and passionate defense of science and clear thinking with this career-spanning collection of essays, including twenty pieces published in the United States for the first time. “Science in the Soul” brings together forty-two essays, polemics, and paeans–all written with Dawkins’s characteristic erudition, remorseless wit, and unjaded awe of the natural world.

“Stanton: Lincoln’s War Secretary” by Walter Stahr. Of the crucial men close to President Lincoln, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton (1814-1869) was the most powerful and controversial. Stanton raised, armed, and supervised the army of a million men who won the Civil War. He organized the war effort. He directed military movements from his telegraph office, where Lincoln literally hung out with him.

“You Play the Girl: On Playboy Bunnies, Stepford Wives, Train Wrecks, & Other Mixed Messages” by Carina Chocano. From the moment we’re born, we’re told stories about what girls are and they aren’t, what girls want and what they don’t, what girls can be and what they can’t. “The girl” looms over us like a toxic cloud, permeating everything and confusing our sense of reality. “In You Play the Girl,” Carina Chocano shows how we metabolize the subtle, fragmented messages embedded in our everyday experience and how our identity is shaped by them.

“No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need” by Naomi Klein. Klein has spent two decades studying political shocks, climate change, and ‘brand bullies.’ From this unique perspective, she argues that Trump is not an aberration but a logical extension of the worst, most dangerous trends of the past half-century–the very conditions that have unleashed a rising tide of white nationalism the world over. It is not enough, she tells us, to merely resist, to say ‘no.’ Our historical moment demands more: a credible and inspiring ‘yes,’ a roadmap to reclaiming the populist ground from those who would divide us”–Amazon.co

“The President’s Kitchen Cabinet: The Story of the African Americans Who Have Fed Our First Families, from the Washingtons to the Obamas” by Adrian Miller. Miller brings together the names and words of more than 150 black men and women who played remarkable roles in unforgettable events in the nation’s history. A treasury of information about cooking techniques and equipment, the book includes twenty recipes for which black chefs were celebrated.

“Full Recovery: The Recovering Person’s Guide to Unleashing Your Inner Power (Third Edition, New)” by Brian McAlister. It s no wonder Full Recovery has become the go-to resource for those in recovery and treatment professionals alike. Brian McAlister’s personal journey from nomadic drug-addicted biker to successful entrepreneur and businessman is beyond inspirational.    More than simply serving as a renowned guide for navigating the road to recovery, McAlister takes readers on a spiritual journey of empowerment and self-discovery.

“The Systems View of Life: A Unifying Vision” by Fritjof Capra and Pier Luigi Luisi. Over the past thirty years, a new systemic conception of life has emerged at the forefront of science. New emphasis has been given to complexity, networks, and patterns of organisation, leading to a novel kind of ‘systemic’ thinking. This volume integrates the ideas, models, and theories underlying the systems view of life into a single coherent framework.

This is just a sampling of new books now available from any of the four branches of Josephine Community Libraries, thanks to funding from the Carpenter Foundation, the Meyer Memorial Trust, Grants Pass Friends of the Library, and donors like you and your neighbors.