New Fiction May 2018

The following titles have been ordered for your library, and will soon be available in the catalog:

 

“17th Suspect” by James Patterson. Also available in Large Print edition. A series of shootings exposes San Francisco to a methodical yet unpredictable killer, and a reluctant woman decides to put her trust in Sergeant Lindsay Boxer. The confidential informant’s tip leads Lindsay to disturbing conclusions, including that something has gone horribly wrong inside the police department itself. The hunt for the killer lures Lindsay out of her jurisdiction, and gets inside Lindsay in dangerous ways.

 

“Adjustment Day” by Chuck Palahniuk. People pass the word only to those they trust most: Adjustment Day is coming. They’ve been reading a mysterious book and memorizing its directives. They are ready for the reckoning. When Adjustment Day arrives, it fearlessly makes real the logical conclusion of every separatist fantasy, alternative fact, and conspiracy theory lurking in the American psyche.

 

“Arabella and the Battle of Venus” by David D. Levine. Arabella’s wedding plans to marry Captain Singh of the Honorable Mars Trading Company are interrupted when her fiance is captured by the French and sent to a prisoner-of-war camp on swampy Venus. Now, Arabella must find passage to an enemy-controlled planet in the middle of a war, bribe or fight her way past vicious guards, and rescue her Captain.

 

“Bats in the Belfry” by Martin Edwards. Bruce Attleton dazzled London’s literary scene with his first two novels – but his early promise did not bear fruit. When Bruce is called away on a sudden trip to Paris, he vanishes completely – until his suitcase and passport are found in a sinister artist’s studio, the Belfry, in a crumbling house in Notting Hill. Inspector Macdonald must uncover Bruce’s secrets, and find out the identity of his mysterious blackmailer.

 

“Count All Her Bones” by April Henry. Six months ago, Griffin Sawyer meant to steal a car, but he never meant to steal the girl asleep in the backseat. Panicked, he took her home. His father, Roy, decided to hold Cheyenne–who is blind–for ransom. Griffin helped her escape, and now Roy is awaiting trial. As they prepare to testify, Griffin and Cheyenne reconnect and make plans to meet. But the plan goes wrong and Cheyenne gets captured by Roy’s henchmen.

 

“The Family Gathering” by Robyn Carr. Having left the military, Dakota Jones is at a crossroads in his life. With his elder brother and youngest sister happily settled in Sullivan’s Crossing, he shows up hoping to clear his head before moving on to his next adventure. But, like every visitor to the Crossing, he’s immediately drawn to the down-to-earth people and the seemingly simple way of life. Dakota is unprepared for how quickly things get complicated.

 

“The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye” by David Lagercrantz, audiobook read by Simon Vance. From the author of the #1 international bestseller “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” comes the new installment in Stieg Larsson’s Millennium series. Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist are together once again in this thrilling full-tilt novel that takes on some of the most insidious problems facing the world at this very moment.

 

“A Loyal Spy” by Simon Conway. Friends since childhood, Jonah and Nor ed-Din had been groomed for the intelligence service, with Jonah as handler for Nor’s penetration of ISI. Years later, when contact with Nor is revived to stage an off-the-books, multi-agency assassination attempt on Bin Laden that goes badly wrong, Jonah no longer knows who Nor is really working for–and whether he has simply taken revenge on his former countrymen in a private act of jihad.

 

“The Mars Room” by Rachel Kushner. It’s 2003 and Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility, deep in California’s Central Valley. Outside is the world from which she has been severed: the San Francisco of her youth and her young son, Jackson. Inside is a new reality: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials needed to survive, the bluffing and pageantry and casual acts of violence by guards and prisoners alike, and the deadpan absurdities of institutional living.

 

“The Perfect Mother” by Aimee Molloy. They call themselves the May Mothers–a group of new moms whose babies were born in the same month. Twice a week, they get together in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park for some much-needed adult time. When the women go out for drinks at the hip neighborhood bar, they are looking for a fun break from their daily routine. But on this hot Fourth of July night, something goes terrifyingly wrong: one of the babies is taken from his crib.